Art Works for Virginia 2019 Agenda

Draft 1/19/2019

8 - 9 AM - Continental Breakfast, Registration and Networking

9 AM - Welcome and Opening Remarks

Keynote Address
Moving Towards Greater Inclusivity: Where Do We Go From Here?
Crystal Williams, Associate Provost, Diversity and Inclusion, Boston University

10:15 – 11:45 AM - Concurrent Breakout Sessions 1

Advocacy in Action: Using Your Voice
Kelly Barsdate, Chief Program and Planning Officer, National Assembly of State Arts Agencies
Jay Dick, Senior Director of State and Local Government Affairs, Americans for the Arts

Still confused about what you can and cannot do when it comes to advocacy? Learn the distinctions between education, advocacy, lobbying, and electioneering, the definitions within, and why it is now more than ever a vital component of institutional and greater sector leadership. Refine your message and identify strategies to execute throughout the year in ways that will not only effectively let your voice be heard, but in ways that are powerful and take minimal time and effort.

Going Big: Resources and Strategies for Successful Funding at the National/Federal Level
Dr. Sarah Bainter Cunningham, Executive Director, Arts Research Institute, Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU)
Haowen Wang, Program Officer, Performing Arts, Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation

Hear the latest on national/federal funding priorities and initiatives of the National Endowment for the Arts, national foundations, and touring/film grants available through Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation. Also, explore strategies for successful fundraising that avoid creating program to chase money and support a greater cultivation of relationship with potential funders.

Pathways for Healing Through the Arts
Niyati Dhokai, Ph.D., Veterans and the Arts Initiative Program Manager, George Mason University
David B. Trinkle, M.D., FAPA, Associate Dean of Community and Culture, Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine
Katherine Biddle, Ph.D., LPC, REAT, Program Coordinator, Dr. Robert A. Keeley Healing Arts, Carilion Clinic
Mark Hierholzer, President and CEO, Art for the Journey
Cindy Paullin, Deputy CEO, Art for the Journey

Over the years, the arts have been proven to not only enhance the quality of life in the community, but to have direct benefits on the mental and physical health and well-being of individuals engaged in the arts and art-making. Hear from three programs across the state who are seeing firsthand the transformational impact of the arts on veterans, older adults, incarcerated individuals, healthcare and healthcare education.

Be Prepared: It’s Not Just for the Scouts
Jan Newcomb, Executive Director, National Coalition for Arts Preparedness and Emergency Relief
Carrie Cleveland, Education and Resources Manager, CERF+

The Commonwealth of Virginia (and nation, as a whole) saw its fair share of natural disasters and close encounters in 2018, with some organizations and artists experiencing loss or destruction on a first-ever personal level. Learn more about national networks of resources and relief, including how to create your own disaster preparedness plans.

11:45 – 12:15 PM - Break

12:15 – 1:45 PM - Luncheon

Performance by VCA Touring Artists After Jack
ArtStars Awards Presentation
Hunter Applewhite, President, Dominion Energy Foundation
Recognition of Margaret Vanderhye
Janet Starke, Executive Director, Virginia Commission for the Arts
Luncheon Keynote
Robert L. Lynch, President and CEO, Americans for the Arts

1:45 – 2:15 PM - Networking

2:15 – 3:30 PM - Concurrent Breakout Sessions 2

Big IDEAs in Small Places
Maryo Gard Ewell, Director of Community Impact, Community Foundation of the Gunnison Valley (CO)
Christina Pollins, Executive Director, Chestnut Creek School of the Arts

What do the concepts of inclusivity, diversity, equity and accessibility really mean in rural arts communities? How do they play out? Hear what is taking place in rural Colorado, and how the Chestnut School for the Arts has worked to revitalize the community of Galax, Virginia, with an ever-present lens on increasing access to the arts for all. What are the opportunities for growth in your community?

The Creative Advantage: How Seattle is Creating Access to Arts for All Students
Lara Davis, Arts Education Manager, Office of Arts & Culture, Seattle, WA

The Creative Advantage is a city-wide initiative with the goal of providing high quality equitable arts education to all students in Seattle Public Schools. This session will highlight the critical efforts of this collective impact agenda from research and evaluation to arts partnerships and community engagement. Drawing from the challenges and success of the initiative, participants will creatively explore opportunities to foster stakeholder engagement and deepen the impact of arts education in their region.

Leveraging Partnerships to Advance Your Development Goals
William Bodine, President & CEO, Greater Lynchburg Community Foundation
Linda Sullivan, President & CEO, ARTSFAIRFAX
Lindsey Norfolk, Foundation Consultant, Dominion Energy Foundation
Kendra Jones, Director for Arts & Equity, Richmond Memorial Health Foundation

Organizations and artists are constantly assessing the local and regional funding landscape to determine the best strategies for fundraising. The more successful organizations are those who find natural alignments to mission, as opposed to creating programs to chase money. Hear from leaders of various sectors of local and regional funding, and learn how they are establishing funding priorities for their communities, views and advice for collaborative programming and the power of relationships in advancing the work.

Public Art: How Stationary Works Can Cultivate Community Engagement
Amina Cooper, Public Art Manager and Curator, Arts and Humanities Council of Montgomery County

Across the country, equity and inclusion strategies are being integrated into public art processes to activate the public realm, revitalize town centers and meet the needs of diverse communities. This session will explore how Montgomery County’s public art program reimagined the traditional planning and commissioning processes to remove barriers for emerging and ALANNA artists and increase engagement among traditionally disenfranchised community members. Participants will learn how to build a public art ecosystem and partnership among funders, local government, and private sectors to advance cultural equity and inclusion in public art.

3:30 – 3:45 PM - Break

3:45 – 5:00 PM - Breakout Session 3

Big IDEAs in Small Places
Maryo Gard Ewell, Director of Community Impact, Community Foundation of the Gunnison Valley (CO)
Christina Pollins, Executive Director, Chestnut Creek School of the Arts

What do the concepts of inclusivity, diversity, equity and accessibility really mean in rural arts communities? How do they play out? Hear what is taking place in rural Colorado, and how the Chestnut School for the Arts has worked to revitalize the community of Galax, Virginia, with an ever-present lens on increasing access to the arts for all. What are the opportunities for growth in your community?

The Creative Advantage: How Seattle is Creating Access to Arts for All Students
Lara Davis, Arts Education Manager, Office of Arts & Culture, Seattle, WA

As Arts Education Manager for the Office of Arts & Culture for the City of Seattle, Lara oversees The Creative Advantage, Seattle’s plan for restoring access to arts education for all students in Seattle Public Schools by 2020. Learn what the City of Seattle and Seattle Public Schools are doing to realize a vision to build a community of creative and critical thinkers who can collaborate to solve problems and are engaged in their communities.

Leveraging Partnerships to Advance Your Development Goals
William Bodine, President & CEO, Greater Lynchburg Community Foundation
Linda Sullivan, President & CEO, ARTSFAIRFAX
Lindsey Norfolk, Foundation Consultant, Dominion Energy Foundation
Kendra Jones, Director for Arts & Equity, Richmond Memorial Health Foundation

Organizations and artists are constantly assessing the local and regional funding landscape to determine the best strategies for fundraising. The more successful organizations are those who find natural alignments to mission, as opposed to creating programs to chase money. Hear from leaders of various sectors of local and regional funding, and learn how they are establishing funding priorities for their communities, views and advice for collaborative programming and the power of relationships in advancing the work.

How to Build Unity Around Big Changes
Becky Caldwell, Executive Director, Virginia Highlands Festival

Here, at the end of the conference, we are brimming with thoughts about how to affect change in our organizations. This session will show you step-by-step how to do exactly that and send you off with the action items and accountability needed to get it done.

5 – 5:30 PM - Annual Meeting – Virginians for the Arts

Closing Reception (Cash Bar)

Performance by VCA Touring Artists Project Locréa

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